Comments ( 8 )

  • User
    Zujind

    6 years ago

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    May 29,  · The rhyme dates back to a few lines of verse from an unknown English poet, who suggested brides carry "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue, a sixpence in your shoe". The first four items are meant to bring good luck, while tucking a sixpence into your shoe was meant to ensure the bride had a life of prosperity.
  • User
    Satilar

    6 years ago

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    The History of Something Old, Something New. The famous wedding recipe derives from the Old English rhyme, "Something Olde, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, A Sixpence in your Shoe"—which names the four good-luck objects (plus a sixpence) a bride should include somewhere in her wedding outfit or carry with her on her wedding day.
  • User
    Mooguzahn

    6 years ago

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    View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Something Borrowed, Something Blue on Discogs.
  • User
    Mugul

    6 years ago

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    Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Annette - Something Borrowed, Something Blue at Discogs. Complete your Annette collection/5(2).
  • User
    Kasar

    6 years ago

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    The Old English rhyme that ends with "a sixpence in your shoe" is all about good luck charms on your wedding day. In case you need a refresher, "something old" symbolizes continuity; "something new" offers optimism for the future; "something borrowed" represents borrowed happiness; and "something blue" stands for purity, love and fidelity.
  • User
    Moogusho

    6 years ago

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    Something Blue. Purity, fidelity and love are all represented in the something blue worn by the bride. Ideas for something blue: wedding shoes, sapphire jewelry, garter, sash for wedding dress, nail polish. Our example: The turquoise blue pledge pin of this bride’s sorority was pinned to the inside of her wedding dress. A Sixpence in your Shoe.
  • User
    Vikus

    6 years ago

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    The wedding tradition of carrying "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue, and a silver sixpence in her shoe" originated in the Victorian era. Since sixpence isn't a currency in the U.S., and plenty of wedding items can count as your "something new," many modern brides focus their attention on the other three criteria. Check out some sentimental and stylish ways to.
  • User
    Nak

    6 years ago

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    The rhyme "Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue" refers to the things a bride is supposed to wear on her wedding day to have a successful marriage. And like most superstitions, it doesn't entirely make sense. There are, of course, many psychology-backed and scientifically grounded ways to have a better marriage. But.